Should You Have an Air Purifier In Your Home or Office?

Home / Blog / Should You Have an Air Purifier In Your Home or Office?

Should You Have an Air Purifier In Your Home or Office?

A sniffle here. A sneeze attack there. A sore throat, low-grade fever, and a red rose sore from wiping later, and those seasonal allergies will turn your beautiful springtime from delightful to dreadful. Though Arizona, once upon a time, used to be a refuge for allergy sufferers, today this desert landscape and all its greenery are a serious contributor to drippy, sneezy, and itchy allergies for visitors and natives alike.

Tack on a breathing disorder like asthma or sinus issues and those seasonal sniffles can become very serious very quickly.

Most people with asthma, allergies, and other conditions that are exacerbated by pollen, dust, and mold have sought relief in the form of inhalers, nasal decongestants, over the counter and prescription medications, saline sprays, Nettie pots, and a slew of holistic methods like daily powdered bee pollen supplements to help alleviate these issues.

Though these approaches are a good start to relieving allergy and seasonal symptoms, most medical professionals suggest taking things one step further when it comes to keeping yourself, your family, and your office healthy – using an air purifier.

As we get used to the air in our homes, it can be hard to detect when your air quality is lacking. If you or someone in your home is experiencing a sharp rise in allergies, repeated sinus infections, exacerbated breathing issues, or if you have a family pet, the chances are good that your home’s air is not as pristine as you think it is.

Particularly in a high-dust place like Arizona, the air that circulates through your home and that you breathe in every day is likely to contain lots of things that are not great for your health, including mold, animal dander, and pollutants.

One of the ways that homes and offices protect their air quality is by adding a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) A/C filter to their air conditioning units to capture much of the airborne pollutants that make their way into your ductwork.

Though many of these filters do an excellent job at reducing the number of unwanted particles in your home, if you or a member of your family have more aggressive or severe reactions to air quality, it may be time to consider adding an air purifier to a main room in your home, like your living room, as well as individual bedrooms to fill your home with the highest quality air.

Air purifiers are designed to do what their name suggests – take in the air around them through an intake vent and push out clean air through a second vent. Inside the purifier, the air is forced through a series of filters, each intended to catch microscopic particles of dust, dander, spores, and allergens. The fine sieves in the air filters trap 99.97% of all particles that are bigger than 0.3 microns in size.

Not only do these filters trap microscopic particles, but the more your times the air in your home circulates through these filters, the more the air is cleaned. Many air filters offer additional filtration options like UV filtration, which can kill bacteria, viruses, and fungi as well.

Depending on your allergy issues, a multi-stage or standard air purifier may be a good idea to add to your arsenal of home health products.

Comments

comments