10 Plants That Improve Indoor Air Quality: Part Two

Home / Blog / 10 Plants That Improve Indoor Air Quality: Part Two

10 Plants That Improve Indoor Air Quality: Part Two

When we head off into the mountains, forests, and parks to get back into nature, we know that we can count on the fresh smell of trees and plants to invigorate us and fill our lungs with clean, crisp air. There is no reason why you can’t experience the same level of outdoor freshness in your home every day. All it takes are a few smartly-placed plants in your home to significantly improve your indoor air quality.

In Part One of this blog, we explored the first four plants that NASA scientists and indoor air specialists recommend adding to your home to reduce the amount of air pollutants and transform your indoor air into a healthy, happy life support system for your home.

5. Boston Fern

Ferns are not only easy to care for and moderately-sized growers (not too big, not too small), but they also do not require a lot of watering, making them a hearty choice for the busy homeowner. Boston Ferns love to grow where there is a good amount of humidity and indirect light, and they look great hanging from baskets and decorating the odd corners of a room.

Boston Ferns remove formaldehyde and xylene from the air and give back fresh clean oxygen in return.

6. Golden Pothos

One of the fastest growing vines around, the Golden Pothos is a notable and favorite houseplant because it is easy to maintain and will grow up a trellis, across a ledge, or down in green leafy tendrils from inside a hanging flower pot. Vines are great home air cleaners because they pull lots of formaldehyde from the air, but the Golden Pothos also yanks carbon monoxide and benzene too, making it a great addition to a room near a garage to prevent car fumes from penetrating your home.

7. Aloe Vera

Heralded as one of nature’s most useful plants, aloe vera is a fantastic house plant that gives back in more ways than one. Not only is aloe vera a plant that is easy to care for, but it is edible, its gel has wound-healing properties, it can be used to prevent and treat sunburns and blisters on your skin, and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties too!

Aloe vera is a smart choice for creating clean, fresh indoor air as it is a big formaldehyde zapper and a gorgeous way to add a pop of green to your home.

8. Gerbera Daisies

These colorful flowers not only look great in your home, but they also help snag pollutants that make their way into your home, like trichloroethylene, formaldehyde, and benzene. These daisies need lots of light to grow and will continue to grow heartily all year long if the temperature is right indoors. These plants serve homeowners two-fold as they can clean your air and keep your supplied with fresh flowers to display for up to two weeks once cut. Just be sure to keep gerbera daisies well-drained and misted a few times a week.

9. Rubber Plants

There is a reason why so many offices opt to include rubber plants in their décor. These plants add vibrancy and life to any dreary space and they are excellent air cleaners too, ready to tackle even high-traffic air cleaning.

In the home, a well-kept rubber plant will need little sun but will remove a lot of chemicals from the air that can be found in furniture, glues, adhesives, and fabrics.

10. Red-edged Dracaena (Dragon Tree)

You may not see it filling the air, but furniture lacquers, varnishes, and glues are big time air pollutants in your home. Enter the red-edged dracaena, a bright green beauty with a striking red outline that removes xylene, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde from your home.

Dracaenas can grow tall – really tall – reaching heights of 15 feet if properly cared for and allowed to grow. The average red-edged dracaena will grow an average of 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide, making it an impressive air cleaner and an attractive plant that will make your home sing with freshness.

Comments

comments